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18-19 Youth Productions/Auditions

A Christmas Carol


by John Jakes

from The Dramatic Publishing Company
Dec. 7th, 8th, 14th and 15th at 7:30
Dec. 8th, 9th, 15th and 16th at 2:30
This version of A Christmas Carol goes beyond other adaptations with a unique dramatic concept: At the opening curtain, Charles Dickens himself is introduced to the audience, ready to present one of the famed platform readings of his stories that packed auditoriums in Europe and America. Of course, the story chosen is one which he often performed, A Christmas Carol (Dickens’ marked-up script still exists!). The story unfolds behind him, and soon Dickens is weaving in and out of the action, observing, performing small roles, interpolating short passages of rich narrative never heard in other versions. He handles props and helps Scrooge and others with costume changes. Originally conceived for Mr. Jakes’ home stage, the Hilton Head Playhouse, the play is supremely flexible in cast and design. The piece includes “God Bless Us Every One,”* a lovely new carol by Jakes and Tony-nominated composer Mel Marvin, as well as suggestions for placement of incidental music. Jim Volz, former managing director of the Alabama Shakespeare Festival where the play received its professional premiere, says of it: “In John Jakes’ hands, A Christmas Carol recaptures the magic and mystique of the Dickens original. It is a brilliant script.”

The Somewhat True Tale
of Robin Hood

by Mary Lynn Dobson

from The Dramatic Publishing Company
Aug 9th, 10th,16th and 17th at 7:30pm
Aug. 10th, 11th, 17th and 18th at 2:30pm
It sure is hard to be humble when you’re a swashbuckling, egocentric super-hero. But our gallant guy-in-green tries his best as he swaggers through The Somewhat True Tale of Robin Hood, a frantically funny, Monty Pythonesque retelling of the classic. This time around, the legendary legend, in his never-ending quest to aid the needy, encounters a lovely damsel-in-distress (oddly obsessed with skin conditions); an ever-scheming sheriff who would rather bowl a strike than hit a bull’s-eye; a gold-hoarding, bad-guy monarch wannabe; and a good-natured “Town’s Guy” who manages to make his way into every scene, whether he belongs there or not. Combine them with an expandable band of spoon-wielding Merry Men whose collective IQs equal six, and you’ve got an irreverent jaunt through Sherwood Forest you won’t soon forget!